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Manuka
09-26-2016, 03:35 PM
Post: #1
Star Manuka
Long is Bronchitis Contagious - Essential Oils - Manuka-New Zealand's Ti-Tree Oil
Manuka (Leptospermum scoparium) is in the myrtle family of botanical plants. The oil comes from New Zealand where it has had a long history of use by the Maori people. The essential oil is extracted by steam distillation from the leaves of the plant. Manuka plants are bushy shrubs that grow wild. The best Manuka oil comes from plants growing at high altitudes. Manuka is one of three tea trees indigenous to both Australia and New Zealand. Manuka essential oil is from The East Cape region of New Zealand and has been confirmed as having the highest antimicrobial activity. There is evidence indicating that it is up to 20 times more potent than Australian tea tree oil (Melaleuca alternifolia). Traditionally the Maori used manuka for bronchitis, rheumatism and similar conditions.

BONUS GIFT By Going to my web site: ***** and signing up for our free monthly newsletter, you can receive a free gift: 5 Monographs on Biblical Oils. Writing an article on Bronchitis was our foremost priority while thinking of a topic to write on. This is because Bronchitis are interesting parts of our lives, and are needed by us.
  • These oils include Frankincense, Myrrh, Cedarwood, Spikenard and Balsam Fir.
  • While you are at our web site, check out our aromatherapy program and our program in Christian energy healing.

How can We Benefit from Manuka Essential Oil Today?
Manuka oil is a little known oil but it has outstanding properties. It is analgesic, anti-allergic, anti-viral, anti-fungal, anti-histamine, anti- infectious, antiseptic, decongestant, insecticide and highly bactericidal across a wide spectrum. It is useful for all respiratory tract infections: colds, catarrh, sinusitis, bronchitis, etc. Its decongestant properties help here too. As an antiseptic for use on the skin, manuka can be applied to cuts, spots, boils, ulcers, etc. It is especially indicated where healing has been slow. Manuka oil can be used in the bath, as a gargle or applied directly on cold sores or on the skin. It can also be used in vaporizers during an epidemic. The safety data for manuka oil is similar to that of tea tree oil. The results of one reading this composition is a good understanding on the topic of Bronchitis. So do go ahead and read this to learn more about Bronchitis.

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  • Want to know more about essential oils and how they can help us stay healthy?
  • Consider becoming a certified clinical aromatherapist.
  • The Institute of Spiritual Healing and Aromatherapy teaches classes throughout the United States on aromatherapy and energy healing.
  • Remember that it is very important to have a disciplined mode of writing when writing.
  • This is because it is difficult to complete something started if there is no discipline in writing especially when writing on Bronchitis Smile
  • Bronchitis is an inflammation of the bronchial tubes, the part of the respiratory system that leads into the lungs.
  • Basically there are two types of bronchitis, acute and chronic bronchitis.
  • Acute bronchitis is a short term illness that becomes more common during cold weather.
  • It is usually followed by viral infection and can be associated with bacterial infections.
  • Acute bronchitis usually clears itself within 2 weeks, but the cough may continue.
  • And in some cases of acute bronchitis it can develop into pneumonia.

Antibiotics for bronchitis are prescribed by doctors, but in many cases the condition does not benefit from antibiotics. Antibiotics will not cure a viral illness because acute bronchitis is usually caused by viruses most doctors do not prescribe antibiotics. Their effectiveness with acute bronchitis is so small compared to the side-effects that these antibiotics may bring. Most common side effects are diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, sore mouth, skin rashes, headache, sunburn easily and vaginal yeast infection. Experts in in the field of infectious disease have been warning for years that overuse of antibiotics is allowing many bacteria to become resistant to the antibiotics available. Just as a book shouldn't be judged by its cover, we wish you read this entire article on Bronchitis Treatment before actually making a judgement about Bronchitis Treatment.

Doctors often prescribe antibiotics because they feel pressured by people's expectations to receive them. This expectation has been fueled by both misinformation in the media and marketing by drug companies. There are some antibiotics which are known for treating both acute and chronic bronchitis but also prescribed for other medical illness. Ampicillin is used for the treatment of infections that result from acute bronchitis. Trimethoprim is an antibiotic used for infections in the respiratory tract. Azithromycin and Amoxicilluin are considered effective treatment for bacterial understanding allergic bronchitis. Telithromycin is a drug used for mild to moderate infections in the respiratory system.

The increase and improper used of antibiotics may also lead to antibiotic resistance in which the bacteria may mutate in ways so they will be able to survive in spite of medications; that means the antibiotics may not work on the next time that it is used. And since most antibiotics are expensive, costs may not be worth the benefits. Acute bronchitis usually clears up on its own in two to three weeks just by drinking lots of fluids and getting enough rest. Smile

When taking antibiotics you should also be aware of the adverse effects they may bring to your body. Precautionary measures are also important when taking antibiotics clear bronchitis and these include, consulting your doctor of the severity of bronchitis before beginning antibiotics and taking the antibiotics as prescribed, do not stop or miss doses. Consulting your Obstetrician or gynecologist is also important if you are pregnant.
  • Some experts advise not to take antibiotics for acute bronchitis especially when you do not have other medical problems.
  • It will not only save you from potential side-effects but also from unnecessary expenses.

The fluoroquinolones are a relatively new group of antibiotics. Fluoroquinolones were first introduced in 1986, but they are really modified quinolones, a class of antibiotics, whose accidental discovery occurred in the early 1960.

The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections. We consider that we have only touched the perimeter of information available on Bronchitis. There is still a lot more to be learnt!

Fluoroquinolones are approved for use only in people older than 18. They can affect the growth of bones, teeth, and cartilage in a child or fetus. The FDA has assigned fluoroquinolones to pregnancy risk category C, indicating that these drugs have the potential to cause teratogenic or embryocidal effects. Giving fluoroquinolones during pregnancy is not recommended unless the benefits justify the potential risks to the fetus. These agents are also excreted in breast milk and should be avoided during breast-feeding if at all possible. Smile

Because of concern about hepatotoxicity, trovafloxacin therapy should be reserved for life- or limb-threatening infections requiring inpatient treatment (hospital or long-term care facility), and the drug should be taken for no longer than 14 days. Perhaps you may not have been interested in this passage on Bronchitis. In that case, please don't spread this feedback around!

Fluoroquinolones disadvantages: Tendonitis or tendon rupture Multiple drug interactions Not used in children Newer quinolones produce additional toxicities to the heart that were not found with the older agents

All of the fluoroquinolones are effective in treating urinary tract infections caused by susceptible organisms. They are the first-line treatment of acute uncomplicated cystitis in patients who cannot tolerate sulfonamides or TMP, who live in geographic areas with known resistance > 10% to 20% to TMP-SMX, or who have risk factors for such resistance. Perfection has been achieved in this article on Chronic Bronchitis. There is hardly any matter left from this article that is worth mentioning.Perfection has been achieved in this article on Chronic Bronchitis. There is hardly any matter left from this article that is worth mentioning.

The fluoroquinolones are a family of synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents with bactericidal activity. The parent of the group is nalidixic acid, discovered in 1962 by Lescher and colleagues. The first fluoroquinolones were widely used because they were the only orally administered agents available for the treatment of serious infections caused by gram-negative organisms, including Pseudomonas species.

First Generation
The first-generation agents include cinoxacin and nalidixic acid, which are the oldest and least often used quinolones. These drugs had poor systemic distribution and limited activity and were used primarily for gram-negative urinary tract infections. Cinoxacin and nalidixic acid require more frequent dosing than the newer quinolones, and they are more susceptible to the development of bacterial resistance.

Second Generation
The second-generation fluoroquinolones have increased gram-negative activity, as well as some gram-positive and atypical pathogen coverage. Compared with first-generation quinolones, these drugs have broader clinical applications in the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections and pyelonephritis, sexually transmitted diseases, selected pneumonias and skin infections.

Conditions Treated With Fluoroquinolones: Indications and Uses
The newer fluoroquinolones have a wider clinical use and a broader spectrum of antibacterial activity including gram-positive and gram-negative aerobic and anaerobic organisms. Some of the newer fluoroquinolones have an important role in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and intra-abdominal infections. The serum elimination half-life of the fluoroquinolones range from 3 -20 hours, allowing for once or twice daily dosing. :o.

Side Effects
The fluoroquinolones as a class are generally well tolerated. Most adverse effects are mild in severity, self-limited, and rarely result in treatment discontinuation. However, they can have serious adverse effects. If there is the slightest possibility of you not getting to understand the matter that is written here on Chronic Bronchitis, we have some advice to be given. Use a dictionary!

Fourth Generation
The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones add significant antimicrobial activity against anaerobes while maintaining the gram-positive and gram-negative activity of the third-generation drugs. They also retain activity against Pseudomonas species comparable to that of ciprofloxacin. The fourth-generation fluoroquinolones include trovafloxacin (Trovan). This article serves as a representative for the meaning of Bronchitis in the library of knowledge. Let it represent knowledge well. Smile


Healing Qualities of Rosemary Essential Oil | the Sleuth Journal
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Gastrointestinal Effects
The most common adverse events experienced with fluoroquinolone administration are gastrointestinal (nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, and abdominal pain), which occur in 1 to 5% of patients. CNS effects. Headache, dizziness, and drowsiness have been reported with all fluoroquinolones. Insomnia was reported in 3-7% of patients with ofloxacin. Severe CNS effects, including seizures, have been reported in patients receiving trovafloxacin. Seizures may develop within 3 to 4 days of therapy but resolve with drug discontinuation. Although seizures are infrequent, fluoroquinolones should be avoided in patients with a history of convulsion, cerebral trauma, or anoxia. No seizures have been reported with levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gatifloxacin, and gemifloxacin. With the older non-fluorinated quinolones neurotoxic symptoms such as dizziness occurred in about 50% of the patients. Phototoxicity. Exposure to ultraviolet A rays from direct or indirect sunlight should be avoided during treatment and several days (5 days with sparfloxacin) after the use of the drug. The degree of phototoxic potential of fluoroquinolones is as follows: lomefloxacin > sparfloxacin > ciprofloxacin > norfloxacin = ofloxacin = levofloxacin = gatifloxacin = moxifloxacin. Musculoskeletal effects. Concern about the development of musculoskeletal effects, evident in animal studies, has led to the contraindication of fluoroquinolones for routine use in children and in women who are pregnant or lactating. Tendon damage (tendinitis and tendon rupture). Although fluoroquinolone-related tendinitis generally resolves within one week of discontinuation of therapy, spontaneous ruptures have been reported as long as nine months after cessation of fluoroquinolone use. Potential risk factors for tendinopathy include age >50 years, male gender, and concomitant use of corticosteroids. Hepatoxicity. Trovafloxacin use has been associated with rare liver damage, which prompted the withdrawal of the oral preparations from the U.S. market. However, the IV preparation is still available for treatment of infections so serious that the benefits outweigh the risks. Cardiovascular effects. The newer quinolones have been found to produce additional toxicities to the heart that were not found with the older compounds. Evidence suggests that sparfloxacin and grepafloxacin may have the most cardiotoxic potential. Hypoglycemia/Hyperglycemia. Recently, rare cases of hypoglycemia have been reported with gatifloxacin and ciprofloxacin in patients also receiving oral diabetic medications, primarily sulfonylureas. Although hypoglycemia has been reported with other fluoroquinolones (levofloxacin and moxifloxacin), the effects have been mild. Hypersensitivity. Hypersensitivity reactions occur only occasionally during quinolone therapy and are generally mild to moderate in severity, and usually resolve after treatment is stopped. Slang is one thing that has not been included in this composition on Chronic Bronchitis. It is because slang only induces bad English, and loses the value of English.

Because of their expanded antimicrobial spectrum, third-generation fluoroquinolones are useful in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia, acute sinusitis and acute exacerbations of chronic bronchitis, which are their primary FDA-labeled indications. The third-generation fluoroquinolones include levofloxacin, gatifloxacin, moxifloxacin and sparfloxacin. We needed lots of concentration while writing on Bronchitis as the matter we had collected was very specific and important.

Second-generation agents include ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin and ofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin is the most potent fluoroquinolone against P. aeruginosa. Ciprofloxacin and ofloxacin are the most widely used second-generation quinolones because of their availability in oral and intravenous formulations and their broad set of FDA-labeled indications. The magnitude of information available on Chronic Bronchitis can be found out by reading the following matter on Chronic Bronchitis. We ourselves were surprised at the amount!

Third Generation
The third-generation fluoroquinolones are separated into a third class because of their expanded activity against gram-positive organisms, particularly penicillin-sensitive and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, and atypical pathogens such as Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae. Although the third-generation agents retain broad gram-negative coverage, they are less active than ciprofloxacin against Pseudomonas species. Writing this composition on Chronic Bronchitis was a significant contribution of ours in the world of literature. Make this contribution worthwhile by using it.

Classification of Fluoroquinolones
As a group, the fluoroquinolones have excellent in vitro activity against a wide range of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The newest fluoroquinolones have enhanced activity against gram-positive bacteria with only a minimal decrease in activity against gram-negative bacteria. Their expanded gram-positive activity is especially important because it includes significant activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae. Maintaining the value of Bronchitis was the main reason for writing this article. Only in this way will the future know more about Bronchitis.

Fluoroquinolones Advantages:
Ease of administration Daily or twice daily dosing Excellent oral absorption Excellent tissue penetration Prolonged half-lives Significant entry into phagocytic cells Efficacy Overall safety Give yourself a momentary pause while reading what there is to read here on Chronic Bronchitis. Use this pause to reflect on what you have so far written on Chronic Bronchitis.
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